Police legitimacy: Resources and a NIJ seminar on April 21 in DC

by , April 9, 2014

As part of its Research for the Real World seminar series, the National Institute of Justice will host the event “Building Trust Inside and Out: The Challenge of Legitimacy Facing Police Leaders,” featuring Professor Dennis Rosenbaum, director of the Center for Research in Law and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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The value of crime analysts: Part 2 of a Q&A with BJA visiting fellow Craig Uchida

by , April 3, 2014

Dr. Craig D. Uchida is the president of Justice & Security Strategies, Inc., where he oversees contracts and grants with cities, counties, criminal justice agencies, foundations, and foreign nations. He is also a member of the Law Enforcement Forecasting Group (LEFG), a program of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA.) Last year, LEFG asked Vera’s Cost-Benefit Knowledge Bank to develop the paper Putting a Value on Crime Analysts: Considerations for Law Enforcement Executives.

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The value of crime analysts: Part 1 of a Q&A with BJA visiting fellow Craig Uchida

by , April 1, 2014

140326 UchidaDr. Craig D. Uchida is the president of Justice & Security Strategies, Inc., where he oversees contracts and grants with cities, counties, criminal justice agencies, foundations, and foreign nations. He is also a member of the Law Enforcement Forecasting Group (LEFG), a program of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). Last year, LEFG asked CBKB to develop the paper Putting a Value on Crime Analysts: Considerations for Law Enforcement Executives.

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New from CBKB, “Putting a Value on Crime Analysts: Considerations for Law Enforcement Executives”

by , March 27, 2014

Like other government agencies, police departments are under great pressure to get the biggest return possible when investing taxpayers’ dollars on justice programs and policies. Leaders of the Law Enforcement Forecasting Group of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance asked staff from CBKB to develop this document, to help police departments address questions about spending on crime analysts—and about justifying that spending.

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Take five: The most popular CBKB blog posts from 2013

by , December 19, 2013

Which CBKB blog posts from this year were most widely read? The following list spells them out, with one caveat: We excluded guest blog posts, which we highlighted last week.

So here are the Top Five posts from 2013:

  1. Quantity isn’t quality: A look at the complex costs and benefits of policing
  2. New to CBKB.org?

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No pat answers: Costs and benefits of policing strategies

by , September 26, 2013

Last week the Vera Institute of Justice’s Center on Youth Justice published the report Coming of Age with Stop and Frisk: Experiences, Self-Perceptions, and Public Safety Implications. The report found that among roughly 500 young people surveyed in highly patrolled, high-crime areas of New York City, “trust in law enforcement and willingness to cooperate with police is alarmingly low.”

Such findings serve as a reminder that some benefits and costs are not easily monetized, such as the benefit of a community’s improved trust in the police department or the cost of that trust being compromised.

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Quantity isn’t quality: A look at the complex costs and benefits of policing

by , January 30, 2013

A page-one article in Saturday’s New York Times raised fascinating questions about what other jurisdictions can learn from New York City, where the police force expanded in the 1990s and both crime and incarceration have decreased since then. CBKB staff often field questions about whether the benefits of hiring more police officers outweigh the costs.

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Four questions for Michael Scott

by , September 19, 2011

This post is part of our “Four questions” guest-blog series that highlights the people and organizations in the growing community of practice around cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and justice policymaking. We’re grateful to Michael Scott, director of the Center for Problem-Oriented Policing, for contributing to this series.

1.   Could you tell us about your work and how it relates to CBA and justice?

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Four questions for Paul Heaton

by , August 29, 2011

This post is part of our “Four questions guest blog series that highlights the people and organizations in the growing community of practice around cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and justice policymaking. We’re grateful to Paul Heaton, economist at the RAND Corporation, for contributing to this series. Heaton is the research director of RAND’s Institute for Civil Justice and a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School.

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Managing policing costs by increasing legitimacy

by , February 28, 2011

Deterrence theory tells us that people obey the law because they fear the consequences of getting caught. Deterrence works, says Yale law professor Tracey Meares in a recent presentation to the National Institute of Justice, but it’s costly and contributes to a steady demand for more police officers to increase the odds that crime will be detected.

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More affordable policing

by , February 24, 2011

In 2007, local police department budgets in the United States totaled more than $55.4 billion. From 1982 to 2006, police expenditures outpaced spending on both the courts and corrections, growing at a rate of 8.6 percent each year, or 3.8 percent when controlling for inflation.

George Gascón, former chief of police and now district attorney of San Francisco, and Todd Foglesong, senior research associate at Harvard, examine the factors driving up police expenditures in Making Policing More Affordable: Managing Costs and Measuring Value in Policing.

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Targeting resources and reducing crime through hot-spots policing

by , February 23, 2011

Research tells us that crime is clustered in small areas, or hot spots, that account for disproportionate amounts of crime. In Minneapolis, for instance, three percent of the city’s addresses accounted for 50 percent of all calls for service, and in Jersey City, NJ, four percent of its streets and intersection areas generated nearly half of the city’s narcotics arrests.

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Guest blog post: The costs and consequences of more policing

by , February 22, 2011

Mark Bergstrom is the executive director of the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing. He is also an adviser to the Cost-Benefit Analysis Unit at the Vera Institute of Justice. Parts of this guest post were originally published in the February 2011 issue of Criminology and Public Policy.

In a recent paper in Criminology and Public Policy, Steven Durlauf and Daniel Nagin ask whether both imprisonment and crime can be reduced.

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CBKB’s February Focus: Policing

by , February 2, 2011

What’s the best way to deploy limited resources to prevent and control crime? Finding an answer to this question has become increasingly urgent in the field of policing. In a recent poll of more than 200 police departments by the Police Executive Research Forum, 63 percent of departments said they are preparing for cuts to their total funding for the next fiscal year.

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