Police legitimacy: Resources and a NIJ seminar on April 21 in DC

by , April 9, 2014

As part of its Research for the Real World seminar series, the National Institute of Justice will host the event “Building Trust Inside and Out: The Challenge of Legitimacy Facing Police Leaders,” featuring Professor Dennis Rosenbaum, director of the Center for Research in Law and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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The value of crime analysts: Part 2 of a Q&A with BJA visiting fellow Craig Uchida

by , April 3, 2014

Dr. Craig D. Uchida is the president of Justice & Security Strategies, Inc., where he oversees contracts and grants with cities, counties, criminal justice agencies, foundations, and foreign nations. He is also a member of the Law Enforcement Forecasting Group (LEFG), a program of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA.) Last year, LEFG asked Vera’s Cost-Benefit Knowledge Bank to develop the paper Putting a Value on Crime Analysts: Considerations for Law Enforcement Executives.

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The value of crime analysts: Part 1 of a Q&A with BJA visiting fellow Craig Uchida

by , April 1, 2014

140326 UchidaDr. Craig D. Uchida is the president of Justice & Security Strategies, Inc., where he oversees contracts and grants with cities, counties, criminal justice agencies, foundations, and foreign nations. He is also a member of the Law Enforcement Forecasting Group (LEFG), a program of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). Last year, LEFG asked CBKB to develop the paper Putting a Value on Crime Analysts: Considerations for Law Enforcement Executives.

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New from CBKB, “Putting a Value on Crime Analysts: Considerations for Law Enforcement Executives”

by , March 27, 2014

Like other government agencies, police departments are under great pressure to get the biggest return possible when investing taxpayers’ dollars on justice programs and policies. Leaders of the Law Enforcement Forecasting Group of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance asked staff from CBKB to develop this document, to help police departments address questions about spending on crime analysts—and about justifying that spending.

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New from CBKB: A Guide to Calculating Justice-System Marginal Costs

The costs and benefits of criminal justice policies affect us all—taxpayers, elected officials, practitioners, and society as a whole. As cost-benefit analysts and budget officials know, any meaningful discussion about government costs requires an understanding of marginal costs because these are the costs affected by policy changes.

Because little concrete information is available about how to calculate marginal costs for cost-benefit analyses (CBA) of justice policies or programs, CBKB has published A Guide to Calculating Justice-System Marginal Costs.

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It bears repeating: Marginal costs matter.

by , April 10, 2013

This spring CBKB will publish A Guide to Calculating Justice-System Marginal Costs. Primarily a “how-to” technical guide for analysts, the publication is also intended to inform policymakers who have an interest in the costs and benefits of criminal justice initiatives. (Note: We published the guide in May.)

This won’t be the first time CBKB has addressed marginal costs.

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Quantity isn’t quality: A look at the complex costs and benefits of policing

by , January 30, 2013

A page-one article in Saturday’s New York Times raised fascinating questions about what other jurisdictions can learn from New York City, where the police force expanded in the 1990s and both crime and incarceration have decreased since then. CBKB staff often field questions about whether the benefits of hiring more police officers outweigh the costs.

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Misperception #2: Policymakers use cost-benefit studies to justify more public spending.

by , March 28, 2012

A cost-benefit analysis, when done properly, can provide a solid justification for more government spending (or public investment, depending on your point of view). But cost-benefit studies can also address other questions:

In what areas can government reduce or avoid spending? One of the best-known examples is the Washington State Institute for Public Policy’s examination of program and policy options to reduce the future need for prison beds, reduce crime, and save taxpayer dollars, the results of which enabled the state to avoid building a new prison in 2007.

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